Five reasons to go and see La Monnaie’s Lucio Silla

La Monnaie have a brand new re-interpretation of Mozart’s Lucio Silla up their sleeve. Manned by an all-round stellar team lead by Tobias Kratzer and Antonello Manacorda, the country’s federal opera house is revisiting this poignant and haunting piece for the first time in over three decades. Running until the 15th of November and only on select nights, we dissect five key points for attending this sublime opera.

The legendary Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) devised his fifth opera piece Lucio Silla in 1772, at the astonishing age of 16. After the successful Mitridate, it recounts another tale of love, lust and heartache amongst power-hungry individuals in Ancient Rome. In comparison to his other pieces, this is arguably one of Mozart’s most honest and personal productions in his short yet extensive career. An unmissable opportunity to grasp at the emotions and occurences of a young, teenage Mozart.

Pierre-Philippe Hofmann (c)

Though the note-worthy German director Tobias Kratzer naturally bases his production on Mozart, he goes far beyond a mere replication. Avoiding a historicising approach, Kratzer seeks to understandably place Lucio Silla in the 21st Century, beautifully fusing this Classical opera with modern-day psychology and a contemporary setting. Kratzer draws from neo-gothic thrillers and dark aesthetics to create a suspenseful, daring production.

Pierre-Philippe Hofmann (c)

And it’s thanks to the sublime cast that all these elements are brought together, made up of top-notch Mozart singers. English tenor Jeremy Ovenden as Silla, the rising Dutch soprano Lenneke Ruiten as Giunia, Italian mezzo-soprano and International Opera Award winner Anna Bonitatibus as Cecilio, and Belgian soprano Ilse Eerens to name a few – this has all the signs for a promising night.

Pierre-Philippe Hofmann (c)

Of course, one can not mention Mozart without discussing his music. Kratzer is joined by the prestigious and experienced Mozart conductor Antenello Manacorda, who also made a praised Monnaie debut last season with Cunning Little Vixen. Besides the in-house symphonic orchestra, the resident choir is lead by Martino Faggiani.

Pierre-Philippe Hofmann (c)

Finally, this is a great opportunity to see La Monnaie’s newly renovated space – especially if you were unable to get tickets for the highly popular Pinocchio at the start of their season. They’re sure to incorporate their newly installed fly loft, with four stage lifts into their act. Not to be missed.

Running on the 29th and 31st of October; 3rd, 4th 7th, 9th, 12th and 15th of September
Wide range of seats available, from €10-€149
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