Ghent-based artist, Tine Guns (Aalst, 1983), uses mediums such as film, photography and installations to explore human perception, memory, and the fragmented notion of time in the human experience. We take a look at some of her most recent works, talking starting points, intentions and the challenges of capturing an evolving reality.

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Guns, Tine.

What would you say is the starting point of your work?

Ever since first starting art school I’ve always been concerned with the problem of catching a reality that is never static, always moving forward. But most of all, how we as people evolve constantly. I’m always attracted to work that can generate multiple meanings. For me a good painting or film can’t be understood in one single viewing. It grows with you. What you encounter in your life is very important in how you perceive art. So it’s all about perception for me and memory is a big part of that. I suffered from epileptic attacks and absences during my childhood and adolescence. So I have black holes in my memory which are now filled with stories of which I’m not sure anymore, build with fragments I remember, or I think I remember because they were told by others. Of course it’s like that with every recollection after some years but maybe that’s a reason why I’m very aware of this.

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Guns, Tine. Triple Entente, 2015.

Is there something very specific you’re hoping it expresses and communicates?

I’m hoping that my work touches people of different ages. I also like to rediscover work at different phases in my life – being a student, with a new lover, or since becoming a mother. I always rediscover some of my favorite films, music, etc., and they touch me on different emotional or intellectual levels. I try to achieve this in my own work by working a lot with associations. I like it when people try to make stories out of my work. And certainly when they are aware of the fact that it’s their story. So I sometimes work with the parameters of a medium to evoke this awareness.

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Guns, Tine. Amoureux Solitaire, 2014.

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What is your preferred medium for exhibiting your work? Book? Solo show? Group exhibition?

I work with a lot of mediums like films, installations, photography and books. Each has its own parameters which are interesting to work with. Since I’m working with editing, my first love is cinema. But my real fetish is paper… I love to smell in books and touch different papers. I love bookstores and libraries.

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Guns, Tine. A Vertigo Kiss, 2014.

What were your original ideas and intentions at the start of working on your latest series?

There will be a published version of my dummy ‘the Diver,’ which was made as part of the exhibition ‘De Zee, Salut d’honneur Jan Hoet.’ Last year in Paris I saw the exhibition of Hokusai, and besides the genius drawings I was particularly interested in his manga, or sketches, and books where one image was spread in two frames. I started to look into it and also took a closer look at the work of another Japanese master: Osamu Tezuka. More specifically, their use of the frame or the panel was a great inspiration. The transitions between the frames and especially the ‘aspect-to-aspect panel transitions’ that define Osamu Tezuka’s manga were very important in the construction of ‘The Diver.’ I focused on the way our mind creates a story out of two or more fragments of an image. I wondered what this would result in if I’d translated this to photography. The Frames in “The Diver” are to be read as the frames of the window between the inside of a hotel room and the seaside outdoors.

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Guns, Tine. The Diver, Dummy, 2015.

What’s in store for the near future?

I’m currently working on a film and an exhibition about rituals and masks that will open in Netwerk, Aalst in January 2016.

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Guns, Tine.

 
All images courtesy of Tine Guns.
tineguns.com