Héloïse Rival on her work, challenges and the everyday inspirations

In light of the brand new design festival Collectible, The Word-favourite creative collective The Hope has invited an impressive roster of artists from all around. One of them is Héloïse Rival and her continuous disruption of conventional practices. We’ll be doing our bit to shine some light on these creatives ahead of the festival opening this Thursday 8th, in a rather impromptu yet necessary collaborative mini-series.

At its core, what is your work about?

I use images, data and some of my previous drawings to create new pictures through screen printing. These pictures are a source of inspiration in themselves. I superimpose and juxtapose them to recreate a flat surface rendered by pixels, reprinting them into larger sizes. The weft becomes the dot; the material of the picture. In terms of process, the way I work on my drawings is very spontaneous and free. As a joke, the process takes much more space than the subject.

How would you describe it?

Extracting image data from an excessive flow of information and modifying them allows me to question practices like painting and drawing by using digital tools, for example.

Who would you say was instrumental in shaping your artistic practice?

We could evoke digital art moving to crafts. My parents are painters. Due to this education, my work is always involving painting, even in my ceramics or weaving.

We are facing many social challenges today, not only due to the country we live in, but also the global occidental system more generally.

What are the challenges you face as an artist working in Belgium today?

As a cosmopolitan country, Belgium hosts a varied artistic scene. I consider my work to be more influenced by everyday life rather than being explicitly artistically referenced. We are facing many social challenges today, not only due to the country we live in, but also the global occidental system more generally.

What does success look like to you?

I truly believe that success involves honesty, curiosity and personal questions and the desire to look for answers regarding art and history, while at the same time involving some sort of automatism in one’s life and communications.

On a more personal note, how does your everyday inform your work?

For a long time I thought of art as a social act, using silkscreen and the multiple process to hitch my work to city walls, questioning the open accessibility and distribution compared to galleries with the aim to reach the people in the town – or simply a larger audience. But I don’t consider my work as street art at all. My work is 100% day-to-day influenced, by sketches, images data …

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