A weekend of Warhol, Wilde Things, MAD and MØ

Brussels

1. Adam McEwen at Rodolphe Janssen Gallery

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Contemporary pop and consumer culture provide the inspiration for Londoner Adam McEwen‘s boundary-breaking work, which features such banal subjects as chewing gum, newspaper obituaries, text messages and shop signage. His latest sponge works are now being shown at Rodolphe Janssen Gallery, in which he resurrects this iconic series by reprinting his old gum photos on cellulose sponge, soaking them in resin and mounting them on aluminium. An intriguing and funny exercise that exposes the blurred lines between history, reality and fiction.

Opening 7 November
Galerie Rodolphe Janssen, Rue de Livourne 35 Livornostraat – 1050 Brussels
www.galerierodolphejanssen.com

2. Splash, Can and Cock at Komplot

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This slightly provocatively titled duo show, ‘Splash, Can and Cock’, unites the work of Belgian artist Jakup Auce with that of Swedish-born Carl Palm. Seeing as their creations are visible through Komplot’s front windows, this winter expo is basically open 24 hours a day, and plays on the notion of passersby commenting on window displays à la  fashion stores, especially around Christmas.

Until 15 March
Komplot, Avenue Van Volxemlaan 295 – 1190 Brussels
www.kmplt.be

3. Gold Panda at Botanique

This London-side electronic music producer sprang to fame a few years ago with raved-about remixes for big shots like Bloc Party and Simian Mobile Disco. His subsequent debut album Lucky Shiner was a phenomenal happy-sad collage of exotic samples and chopped and screwed sounds, and was an instant success with critics and fans. Three years later and he’s toured the world and released a follow-up record called ‘Half of Where We Live’, which NME describes as “warm, thoughtful and special” and now you can check him out live this weekend at Botanique. While you’re gearing up for that, read our interview with the man here.

7 November
Botanique, Rue Royale 236 Koningsstraat – 1000 Brussels
www.botanique.be 

4. MØ at Ancienne Belgique

Karen Marie Ørsted, better known as , has more than once been labeled the new Grimes. The talented girl from Copenhagen, described by Pitchfork as  “halfway point between Purity Ring’s vocal-fucked acrobatics and Twin Shadow’s new-wave dreamscapes” hasn’t released a debut album yet but has already made quite a buzz. She’s currently on tour with her acclaimed EP Bikini Daze and this weekend you can check her out at Brussels’ AB.

8 November
Ancienne Belgique, Avenue Anspach 10 Anspachlaan – 1000 Brussels
www.abconcerts.be 

5. MAD Fashion Sales at Halles Saint Géry

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Celine Pinckers, Monsieur Bul, Sandrina Fasoli, Rue Blanche, Vanessa Vukicevic… MAD’s annually fashion sale jamboree has a laundry list of wicked must-buy offers for fashionistas looking for designer pieces at reduced price tags. Hosted in Les Halles in St Géry, shoppers are treated not only to the wares of established designers but also those of Belgium’s newest talent – all without stressing your bank account too much.

From 8 to 9 November
Halles Saint-Géry, Place Saint-Géry 1 Sint-Goriksplein – 1000 Brussels
www.madbrussels.be

Antwerp

6. Jessica Backhaus at Stieglitz

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Stieglitz’ exhibition Once, Still and Forever is a showcase of a selection of photographs by German artist Jessica Backhaus. Backhaus has a knack for contemplative, melancholic still lives and her images show everything from abandoned swimming pools and brick walls to glass bottles and kitchen spoons, intelligently playing with shapes and colours to reveal beauty in the most ordinary objects.

Opening 7 November
Stieglitz 19, Klapdorp 2 – 2000 Antwerp
www.stieglitz19.be

7. Mona Vatamanu and Florin Tudor at Extra City

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Antwerp’s Extra City is presenting two new films and an installation by Romanian duo Mona Vǎtǎmanu and Florin Tudor. Through local case studies – such as the mining project Rosia Montana – they examine the effects of democratic transition, environmental destruction and economic war in their home country, reflecting on not only human rights but also the rights of nature and animals. A rather gloomy, apocalyptic vision of today’s world, but worth a look all the same.

Until 17 November
Extra City, Eikelstraat 25 – 31 – 2600 Antwerpen
www.extracity.org

Ghent

8. Heide Hinrichs and Allison Hrabulik at Galerie Tatjana Pieters

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Ghent’s Galerie Tatjana Pieters is presenting two fascinating solo shows these days: a juxtaposition of the works of German artist Heide Hinrichs and Canadian-born Allison Hrabulik. While Heide is presenting a series of new sculptures and textile works produced during her residency at the prestigious Villa Romana in Florence, Allison is premiering a series of animated videos along with works on paper that explore the nature of movement. “The videos illustrate that how something moves can tell us why it moves, perhaps better than a description of who it is,” she says.

Until 8 December
Tatjana Pieters Gallery,  Nieuwevaart 124/001 – 9000 Ghent
www.tatjanapieters.com

Hasselt

9. The Wilde Things at Z33

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“The Wilde Things. The so contemporary jewellery collection of Mrs. Wilde” explores the relationship between jewellery and its wearer, as well as the meanings we attach to it. This is done with the help of a fictional story told through the writings of Oscar van den Boogaard and a movie by Manon de Boer in combination with a selection of fascinating jewellery pieces. A narrative exhibition that features creations by Belgian Hilde De Decker, German Volker Atrops, Swiss Christoph Zellweger and many more.

Until 19 January
Z33, Zuivelmarkt 33 – 3500 Hasselt
www.z33.be

10. Andy Warhol at BAM

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Mons’ Beaux-Arts Museum BAM is reopening with a bang: the exhibition Life, Death and Beauty presents a selection of works by none other than pop art icon Andy Warhol. Uniting about a hundred creations from one of the art world’s biggest stars – including some of his most famous works, such as portraits of Mao Tse-tung or Marilyn Monroe – the expo is a great overview of his oeuvre and provides the chance to discover a number of pieces that have rarely been shown in Europe. “He was a genius, with a keen aesthetic intelligence and a color sense worthy of Matisse,” writes The New Yorker.

Until 19 January
BAM, Rue Neuve – 7000 Mons
www.bam.mons.be